All posts by Parish Secretary

11 – 25 April 2021

Sunday 11 April – Easter II
10:00am
Open for pre-booked attendance only
6:30pm
Open for pre-booked attendance only
Tuesday 13
12:15pm
Public Mass
Wednesday 14
7:00pm
Public Mass
Thursday 15
12:15pm
Public Mass
Saturday 17
9:15am
Public Mass
Sunday 18 – Easter III
10:00am
Open for pre-booked attendance only
6:30pm
Open for pre-booked attendance only
Monday 19
9:15am
Public Mass
Tuesday 20
12:15pm
Public Mass
Wednesday 21
7:00pm
Public Mass
Thursday 22
12:15pm
Public Mass
Friday 23 – St George, Martyr, Patron of England
12:15pm
Public Mass
Saturday 24
9:15am
Public Mass
Sunday 25 – Easter IV
10:00am
Open for pre-booked attendance only
6:30pm
Open for pre-booked attendance only

Hospital Visits

The University Hospital of North Durham still has restrictions in place regarding visits to patients – see the hospital website for the latest information. However, the Catholic Chaplain is still able to visit patients, and can bring them Holy Communion and the Sacrament of the Sick. If you know of a patient who wishes for a visit from the Catholic Hospital Chaplain, please inform Fr Paul Tully on 01388 818544 or frpaultully@outlook.com 

For visits to patients in St Cuthbert’s Hospice, in care homes or in their own homes, please contact Fr Andrew.

Donations & Gift Aid

(1) As the parish’s financial year is drawing to a close, we will soon be compiling our Gift Aid return. If any Gift Aid donors now believe that they will not have paid sufficient income tax to cover the Gift Aid on their donations (25p for every £1 donated) then please let Fr Andrew or Andy Doyle know as soon as possible. Also, if any donors have changed address in the last year and have not already informed the parish or the Gift Aid team at the Diocesan Offices then, again, let Fr Andrew or Andy Doyle know.

If you are not already part of the Gift Aid scheme and would like to know more, contact Andy Doyle on 0798 543 4185 or andydoyle1066@sky.com. Thank you for your generosity.

(2): Lockdown has led to a number of donors who have previously given via weekly envelopes switching to standing orders. If you would like to donate in this way, which is more convenient for both the donor and the parish, please contact Andy for guidance as to how to make the switch.

(3): New donation envelopes will be available soon for those who wish to continue to use this method. Please let Andy know if you do wish to receive a box of envelopes to be used from early April.

The light is dawning

It is still dark when Mary of Magdala goes to Jesus’ tomb, early in the morning. But she can see that something has happened. The stone blocking the entrance has been moved, and the tomb is empty. Mary’s first reaction is to  run to Simon Peter, and the disciple Jesus loves, and share the news with them. What’s going on? The disciples discover that the linen cloths, used to wrap a dead body, have been discarded. Jesus doesn’t need them any more. 

John tells us that, until this moment, the disciples had ‘failed to understand.’ Jesus had taught them that he would rise from the dead, but it was impossible for them to take in his teaching. But now, they see and they believe. They suffered the darkest day of their lives when they saw Jesus die on the Cross, but as the day dawns, the light is dawning for them. As they share the news, the light will dawn for the whole community of disciples – and then for the whole world.

Jesus’ disciples would spend the rest of their lives coming to understand what they had experienced – the mystery of his rising from the dead. We, too, are still coming to understand the full meaning of what God has done. The Resurrection of Christ is good news that changes the world.

WeCraft

WeCraft Durham is a student-led initiative that aims to offer social events and craft activities for older residents in our city. Possible activities include group singing, quizzes, book clubs and creative writing. If you might be interested, please contact Fr Andrew.

Crucify him!

Today’s Mass begins with Jesus’ triumphant entry into the city of Jerusalem. The crowd are shouting ‘Hosanna!’ And yet, a few days later, the same crowd are shouting ‘Crucify him!’ What has changed? Mark tells us that the chief priests incited the crowd to demand the release of Barabbas instead of Jesus. It’s easy to whip up a crowd into an angry mob – not so easy to control the mob’s lust for blood. Even Pontius Pilate, with an army under his command, is afraid of the crowd. He releases Barabbas – guilty of murder – and hands Jesus over to be crucified, knowing him to be innocent. The soldiers make fun of Jesus and the passers-by jeer at him. Even the robbers being crucified with him join in with the mockery. 

It’s a scene that has been repeated many times, throughout history; a crowd ganging up on a helpless victim. Everyone joins in, for fear that they could be the next target. But this time, it is different.  At the moment of his death, Jesus cries out, ‘My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?’ These are the words of a Psalm – a prayer of hope and trust in God. With his last breath, Jesus is calling on his Father to witness his suffering, and expressing his trust in the Father’s plan. He knows that God has not forsaken him.

Holy Week Liturgies

The times of liturgies during Holy Week will be as follows:

  Mass of the Lord’s Supper; Thursday 1st April at 7.00pm

   Celebration of the Lord’s Passion; Friday 2nd April at 3.00pm

   Easter Vigil; Saturday 3rd April at 8.00pm

   Easter Sunday Mass; 4th April at 10.00am 

  (No Evening Mass on Easter Sunday).  

All of the services are now fully booked.

All of these liturgies will be live streamed on St Cuthbert’s YouTube channel.

Diocesan Chrism Mass

The Diocesan Chrism Mass will be celebrated at St Mary’s Cathedral, Newcastle at 11am on Holy Thursday. At this celebration, the Holy Oils are blessed, and the priests and deacons of the diocese renew their commitment to service. Attendance at this year’s Chrism Mass is by invitation only, due to Covid restrictions, but you can watch a live stream on the Cathedral’s YouTube channel.

Wherever I am, my servant will be there too

We are coming closer to Easter. Today’s Gospel finds Jesus in Jerusalem. The authorities are already plotting to kill him. Jesus knows that he has only a few days to live, and knows that he will face a horrible death on the Cross. But he will not be dragged to his death; he goes willingly. The parable of the wheat grain that has to fall to the ground and die, so that it can bear fruit, shows us that Jesus accepts it all as part of the plan of God the Father. His prayer – ‘Father, glorify your name!’ – and the voice of the Father, coming from heaven in response, show us the perfect unity between Father and Son. Jesus’ death will bring glory to his Father, and it will bring hope for us; ‘When I am lifted up, I will draw all people to myself.’ 

Jesus also says, ‘Wherever I am, my servant will be there too.’ Where do we see Jesus? We see him curing the sick and forgiving sinners. We see him among the poor and the outcasts. We see him, in the end, lifted up on the Cross. If we want to be his disciples, we have to be ready to let go of the things of the world – even of life itself. It’s a challenging teaching. But the reward that the Lord promises us is eternal life with him.