All posts by Parish Secretary

25 August – 8 September 2019

Sunday 25 August – Sunday XXI
10:00am
Priest’s intention
6:30pm
Priest’s intention
Monday 26
9:15am
Priest’s intention
Tuesday 27
7:00pm
Priest’s intention
Wednesday 28
7:00pm
Priest’s intention
Thursday 29 – The Passion of St John the Baptist
12:15pm
Priest’s intention
Friday 30
12:15pm
Priest’s intention
Saturday 31 – St Aidan Bp and the Saints of Lindisfarne
9:15am
Priest’s intention
Sunday 1 September – Sunday XXII
10:00am
Priest’s intention
6:30pm
Priest’s intention
Monday 2
9:15am
Priest’s intention
Tuesday 3 – St Gregory the Graet Pp, D
12:15pm
Priest’s intention
Wednesday 4 – The Translation of St Cuthbert
7:00pm
Christine Loughton
Thursday 5
12:15pm
Priest’s intention
Friday 6
12:15pm
Thanksgiving (LR)
Saturday 7
9:15am
Priest’s intention
Sunday 8 – Sunday XXIII
10:00am
Priest’s intention
6:30pm
Priest’s intention

The Narrow Door

Jesus is asked, ‘Will there be only a few saved?’ And his answer is ‘No.’ People from all nations will be welcomed to the feast in the kingdom of God – from east and west, from north and south. No one is excluded; God offers salvation to everyone. So why is the door narrow? Jesus gave this teaching to the people at a time when he was making his way through towns and villages on his way to Jerusalem. Many of the people heard his teaching, and saw the miracles that he worked; but only a few, it seems, became his disciples. The door was narrow for them, because Jesus’ call to conversion was too much of a challenge. The door is narrow for us, too, if we are overly attached to the things of this world. But if we respond to Christ’s call, and go through the narrow door, we find that it opens onto the infinitely wide love and mercy of God.

Public Lecture

Durham 1569: A People’s Tragedy? Prof. Eamon Duffy (University of Cambridge, Emeritus) Tuesday 17th September, 6.30-7.45pm in the Debating Chamber, Palace Green, Durham. Entry is free of charge, but registration is essential for those not registering for the Northern Rising conference; please register online at https://centreforcatholicstudies.eventbrite.com or by telephoning 0191 334 1656, by 12noon on Tuesday 17 September.

Events at Minsteracres

The Beatitudes under the rainbow of God’s healing love: This retreat will look at the Beatitudes and colour in terms of our spiritual and psychological growth and developments. The retreat will be held in silence with a daily introduction with time for reflection and questions. Led by Treasa Ridge PBVM, a Presentation Sister with a background in teaching. She is also an experienced retreat director, psychotherapist and colour practitioner. Friday 30 August-Friday 6 September. Suggested donation: £500.

Individually guided retreat: This retreat is held in silence and will be led by members of the Ignatian Spirituality Centre from Glasgow in collaboration with the team at Minsteracres. Friday 30 August-Friday 6 September. Suggested donation: £500.

Walking retreat: Enjoy a walk of 7-10 miles through the beautiful countryside around Minsteracres, with time for prayer, reflection and sharing of the beauty of creation. You will need suitable walking boots and warm, weatherproof clothing. Please bring a packed lunch. Saturday 7 September, 10am-5pm. Suggested donation: £10.

Congratulations

To Ciara Courtney and Matthias Müller, whose Nuptial Mass will be celebrated at St Cuthbert’s this Saturday, 24th August, at 12.30pm. Ciara and Matthias were both students at St Mary’s College from 2008-11. Please pray for them as they begin their married life. Everyone is welcome to the Nuptial Mass.

I have come to bring fire to the earth

We know Jesus as the Prince of Peace. So why does he speak in today’s Gospel of bringing fire to the earth, and of causing division within families? Because Jesus speaks the truth, consistently and fearlessly, and the truth is not always welcome. He denounces injustice and challenges the hypocrisy of the chief priests and elders, who lay heavy burdens on the ordinary people of Israel. He eats with tax collectors and sinners, cures lepers and welcomes pagans. Jesus causes division because he challenges the powerful and disturbs the status quo. Like all of the prophets before him, he encounters opposition and, in the end, the rulers of the people bring about his death in order to silence him.

The Franciscan Legacy

From the 13th Century to the 21st: An international conference hosted by the Centre for Catholic Studies in partnership with the Capuchin Franciscans of Great Britain, to mark the 800th anniversary of St Francis’ meeting with Sultan Malek Al-Kamil. In Durham, Tuesday 5 – Thursday 7 November. Deadline for registration is Monday 30 September. Centre for Catholic Studies email: ccs.admin@durham.ac.uk or tel: 0191 334 1656.

The Kaki Tree Project

Commemorates the sufferings of the people of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, where atomic bombs were dropped on 6th and 9th August 1945. Ewan Anderson will speak about the Kaki Tree at 10.00am Mass on Sunday, to mark the anniversary of the bombs, and will show a drawing of the tree which survived the nuclear blast.

Thursday 15th August is the Feast of the Assumption of Our Lady

A Holy Day of Obligation. Mass will be celebrated at St Cuthbert’s at 7.00pm on Wednesday 14th August (Vigil) and at 12.15pm on Thursday 15th August. Mass in Durham Martyrs parish will be on Thursday 15th at 9.30am at St. Bedes (in St. Godric’s School), 10.00am at St Godric’s church and 7.00pm at St Joseph’s. Mass at St Patrick’s, Langley Moor will be at 6.30pm on Wednesday 14th August (Vigil) and at 9.30am on Thursday 15th August.

Real Treasure

Jesus is faced with a man who asks him to resolve a disagreement with his brother about an inheritance. Such family disputes can bring out the worst in people, and can be impossible to resolve. Jesus refuses to judge between the brothers; instead, he uses the request as an opportunity to teach his disciples. Where does our sense of security come from? If it comes from our wealth and possessions, it is a false security. As the Preacher reminds us in today’s First Reading, all that we own, all that we work for and all that we achieve in this life will be left behind at the moment of our death. Avarice can distort our priorities until wealth becomes a false god for us. The Lord urges us instead to make ourselves truly rich, by loving God and our neighbour. Our only true security comes from our trust in God’s promise of eternal life.

Serve the Lord with Gladness

A Day of Reflection for All Ministries. At Ushaw College, Saturday 28 September, 10.30am – 3.30pm. Led by Fr Mark Millward, Dean of the Benedict Partnership (n.b. this is a repeat of the day offered in May.) Registration and refreshments from 9.45am. Tea, Coffee and a light lunch will be provided. Booking is essential: contact Ciara or Fr Andrew if you wish to take part.

How to Pray

Jesus’ disciples ask him to teach them to pray. They have seen that prayer – time spent in silence, alone with his Father – is at the heart of Jesus’ own life. A distinctive prayer will be a mark of their own identity as Jesus’ disciples. The prayer that Jesus teaches them is simple, but striking. He tells his disciples to address God as ‘Father,’ in trust and simplicity, as he does himself. He tells them to ask God for what they need – daily bread – and to pray for forgiveness of their sins.

Jesus teaches his disciples, too, to be persistent in prayer. When we pray for what we need, we are expressing our absolute dependence on God; recognising that we receive everything we have as a gift from God, like young children who depend completely on their parents. We may feel discouraged when prayer seems to go unheard; we may even wonder if God hears us. But we should never be afraid to ask God for our needs, and we should always trust that our loving Father wishes to give us what is truly best for us.